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01

May
2019

In Inspiration
Research

By Admin

CBC Vancouver’s Hidden Streams

On 01, May 2019 | In Inspiration, Research | By Admin

Spacemakeplace is very interested in Vancouver’s hidden streams.  Check out this short video article by CBC’s Uytae Lee about the history of some Vancouver’s urban streams and daylighting initiatives around the world.  For more information about Vancouver’s streams see our blog post Lost Streams of Vancouver .

Vancouver's hidden streams

Streams are nature's way of handling rain. About 50 of them used to run through Vancouver, but most were considered a nuisance and buried underground.It might be time to bring them back, says CBC Early Edition columnist Uytae Lee.More: www.cbc.ca/1.5111383Video: Uytae Lee/CBC Creator Network

Posted by CBC Vancouver on Thursday, April 25, 2019

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13

Jun
2018

In Inspiration
Make
Place
Project
Research

By Admin

TTC Sherbourne: Tom Thomson Colour Palette

On 13, Jun 2018 | In Inspiration, Make, Place, Project, Research | By Admin

The Sherbourne Station Community Mosaic will use a set of 12 colours that are inspired by the palette of iconic Canadian painter, Tom Thomson.

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Colour testing by Interstyle Ceramic & Glass of the twelve colours chosen for the TTC Sherbourne Community Mosaic

Thomas John Thomson, painter (born 5 August 1877 in Claremont, ON; died 8 July 1917 in Algonquin Provincial Park, ON). An early inspiration for what became The Group of Seven, Tom Thomson was one of the most influential and enduringly popular Canadian artists of the early part of the twentieth century. His paintings The West Wind (1917) and Jack Pine (1916-1917) are familiar Canadian icons.  Thomson was a master colourist.

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Thomson was one of the first artists in residence at the Studio Building, located at 25 Severn Street, in the Rosedale ravine immediately east of the above-ground Ellis portal that brings subway trains into and out of the north end of the Bloor-Yonge subway station, a short walking distance from Sherbourne Station. His studio’s site and positioning takes advantage of the northern exposure that illuminates the artist’s canvas with very even, neutral light.  Completed in 1914, the nonprofit facility was financed by Lawren Harris, heir to the Massey-Harris farm machinery fortune, and Dr James MacCallum.

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Thomson would spend the summers in Algonquin Park and winter at the Studio Building in a refurbished a workmen’s shed on the east side of the building that MacCallum had converted so Thomson could work in an environment closer to his beloved wilderness settings.

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TTC Sherbourne: Community Workshops

On 09, May 2018 | In infrastructure, Inspiration, Make, News, Place, Project, Research, Space | By Admin

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Over three weeks in March and April, 2018, we led 24 community pattern-making workshops at seven different venues located within a 5-10 min walking radius of TTC Sherbourne Station.  We met with approximately 450 local community members, from kindergarten children to senior citizens, who contributed over 700 unique triangle patterns to this public art project. We are amazed!

Check out all of the pattern design galleries on the Sherbourne Station Community Mosaic Facebook page!

After a brief introduction to the project, participants were invited to create their own triangular patterns by arranging colourful cardboard tiles on special templates.  Twelve different colours reference the bold palette of Tom Thomson, a famous Canadian painter who once had a studio in the nearby Rosedale Ravine. When completed, every pattern was photographed and catalogued, and the individual or group of artists were given the opportunity to provide their name to be included on the public artwork plaque as a contributor.

Later this year, ceramic tile mosaics will be installed at multiple locations around TTC Sherbourne Station.  The mosaics will be assembled from custom-made tiles, manufactured in Canada from recycled glass. Each tile will be twice as large as the cardboard tiles used in the workshops.

The final mosaic pieces will be inspired by the patterns collected from community members.  Parts of individual patterns will be woven together to form new and complex patterns representing the creativity and interconnectivity of the local community.  

We greatly appreciate the hospitality, enthusiasm and support that we have received.  We would like to give special thanks to those who assisted in hosting the workshops: David Crichton, Rose Avenue Junior Public School; Shabana Sohail, Community Matters Toronto; Simon Storey, Rosedale Junior Public School; Allyson Payne, Branksome Hall School; Suja Selvaraj, St. James Town Community Corner; Suzanne Fernando, Toronto Public Library – St James Town Branch; Rick Lee, Wellesley Community Centre; Jaymie Sampa, 519 Space for Change.  Individual pattern-making participants will be acknowledged on a plaque that will be located near the station entrance.

The Sherbourne Station Community Mosaic public artwork has been commissioned by the Toronto Transit Commission as part of the Easier Access and Second Exit Program.

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13

Apr
2017

In Inspiration
News
Place
Research

By Admin

Livable Cities 2017: Sensing the City

On 13, Apr 2017 | In Inspiration, News, Place, Research | By Admin

Livable Cities 2017 – 2nd Annual Symposium

April 13, 2017

Anvil Centre. New Westminster, BC.

Thanks to Livable Cities 2017 for inviting Rebecca to talk about her practice and to give a presention on how our surroundings can stimulate our senses and help inform how we identify with a particular place.

Livable Cities” brings together interdisciplinary research, creative inquiry and city planning methods to explore current city development through sound, smell and other embodied perspectives. Presented by Simon Fraser University and hosted by the City of New Westminster, this one-day symposium will take up various disciplinary approaches, including architecture, community development, and socio-cultural issues. The event will include panels and talks, sensory workshops and sound art presentations. Communities in flux across the Lower Mainland present unique opportunities to engage with city planning strategies, urban densification, and the impact of soundscapes, smellscapes and mobilities on local urban environments.

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16

Aug
2016

In Inspiration
Make
News
Project
Research

By Admin

Calder Community Pattern Making Workshops

On 16, Aug 2016 | In Inspiration, Make, News, Project, Research | By Admin

 

Post-Workshops Update:

11×17 tile photo documentation – compilation of 137 Calder Community Patterns
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13

May
2016

In Project
Research

By Admin

Calder Branch Mosaic Workshops

On 13, May 2016 | In Project, Research | By Admin

Calder Branch Mosaic Workshop Poster

psst – pass it on!

free pattern making workshop

Saturday June 18, 2016

drop in 10am – 6pm

12522 132 Avenue, Edmonton (Calder Branch of Edmonton Public Library)

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09

Jul
2015

In Inspiration
Project
Research

By Admin

Inspiration for Calder Community Patterns

On 09, Jul 2015 | In Inspiration, Project, Research | By Admin

We’re excited about the new Calder Library mosaic project.  The mosaic will be inspired by some of the patterns from the different groups of people who make up this Edmonton community.  Census data shows that the people of Calder originate from countries and cultures from all over the world, and that there is a large Aboriginal population.

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Plains First Nations

Ukraine_pattern

Ukraine

England_pattern

England

Fillipino_pattern

Fillipino

Mexico_pattern

Mexico

China_pattern

China

arabic_pattern

Middle East

Ndebele Artwork on Wall of a House

Africa

 

 

 

 

 

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04

Jul
2015

In Make
News
Project
Research

By Admin

CITY FABRIC – coming soon

On 04, Jul 2015 | In Make, News, Project, Research | By Admin

It’s been several years in the works but CITY FABRIC is now underway and due for installation under the south end of Vancouver’s Burrard Bridge this Summer.  Rebecca (spacemakeplace) and Matthew Soules (MSA) have recently been material testing.  More to come soon…

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Matthew, Rebecca, Jeff and Cam testing the rigging system for CITY FABRIC

 

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30

Jun
2015

In Place
Proposal
Research

By Admin

BOUNTY – public art proposal

On 30, Jun 2015 | In Place, Proposal, Research | By Admin

“The [Burrard] Inlet and Indian Arm have been a source of sustenance for the Tsleil-Waututh people since time out of mind. Our Elders taught us that when the tide went out, the table was set. Industrial development over the past 75 years has made it impossible for our children to enjoy the natural resources that our grandmothers and grandfathers enjoyed.”   – Chief Leah George-Wilson of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation

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Native B.C. Little Neck Clam

BOUNTY is a public art proposal by spacemakeplace inspired by a quote from Chief Leah George-Wilson of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Her people have lived on the shores around Burrard Inlet for millennia. BOUNTY is intended to honor the commitment and spirit of many local communities situated in Vancouver, especially around Burrard Inlet, who are stewards of our waters, air and land.

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BOUNTY Concept Image

BOUNTY abstracts a Littleneck Clam, native to Burrard Inlet, by enlarging it to the size of seating and then casting it in white Ductal®, an ultra-high performance concrete. Ductal® has a fine, shell-like finish and can render realistic detail but is incredibly resilient to hostile environments and so is a perfect material for use in public art where tactility and durability are important.

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BOUNTY Concept Layout

The outsize proportion of the clam sculpture signifies the abundance, or BOUNTY of seafood that a clean and healthy Burrard Inlet can provide. Three clams are proposed to be clustered in a public plaza in Port Moody, BC. as a monument to this important body of water.

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15

Jun
2015

In Inspiration
Research

By Admin

Tessellation Patterns

On 15, Jun 2015 | In Inspiration, Research | By Admin

Tessellations form a class of patterns found in nature. The arrays of hexagonal cells in a honeycomb or the diamond-shaped scales that pattern snake skin are natural examples of tessellation patterns. Distinct shapes are formed from several geometric units (tiles) that all fit together with no gaps or overlaps to form an interesting and united pattern.  Tessellating patterns are abstract and non-representational which makes their interpretation open to the imagination of all people.

Tessellation Patterns in Nature

Honeycomb

Snake_pattern

Snake Skin

RedFlower_pattern

Flower

Leaf_pattern

Leaf

Cracked Mud

Sunflower_pattern

Sunflower

 

Tidal_pattern

Tidal

 

 

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15

May
2015

In Place
Research

By Admin

Alberta’s Most Valuable Resource

On 15, May 2015 | In Place, Research | By Admin

AlbertaSky

Albertan Sky

The land now known as Alberta, has been occupied by people for around 8,000 years. Until less than 150 years ago only the sky and the North Saskatchewan River dominated the views across the sweeping prairie vistas where the City of Edmonton now stands. The success of its continued occupation of these lands will be closely related to the stability and quality of the water supply.

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Canadian Watersheds

The City of Edmonton straddles the North Saskatchewan River which has its headwaters in the Columbia Icefield, high in the Canadian Rockies. The river flows east across Alberta and Saskatchewan to Lake Winnipeg before eventually draining through the Nelson River into Hudson Bay.

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Water runs through Canada’s rivers like blood through the country’s veins. Since time immemorial, people who have inhabited the Prairies have relied on the rivers to sustain life. The North Saskatchewan River is part of one of Canada’s most historic waterways and has anchored the urban and economic development of much of Canada’s western prairies.

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Alberta Oil Sands

Alberta’s economy is one of the strongest in the world and to a significant extent its industries rely on an abundant supply of water. While the Saskatchewan River Basin was once predominately covered with wetlands and grasslands, population increases and industrial land use have placed heavy pressure on the water supply and rendered Alberta the most vulnerable of the Prairie Provinces to water shortages.

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Red Deer River and South Saskatchewan River. Near Empress, AB.

This situation is compounded by indications that the mountain supplies of water are diminishing. Most large glaciers in the headwaters of the Saskatchewan, Bow and Athabasca rivers have shrunk by ~25% in the last century. Environment Canada has stated that the sustainability of freshwater supplies is a growing concern worldwide and it lists the threat to water availability in Alberta as moderate to high.

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15

Apr
2015

In Place
Project
Research

By Admin

WHERENESS – erratic movement

On 15, Apr 2015 | In Place, Project, Research | By Admin

Five thousand years ago a huge glacier, a mile thick covered what is now Vancouver, BC.

LFV_Glacier

As this massive ice sheet flowed down the Fraser Valley and across the Lower Mainland, it pushed and crushed mountains of rock in its path.  When the giant ice sheet receded back up into the mountains at the end of the last Ice Age it deposited millions of large boulders in its wake.

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These glacial erratics remain scattered all over Vancouver, usually buried below the city. As Vancouver grows and the land is developed and redeveloped these ancient boulders are exposed by excavation and removed, once again setting them in motion.

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