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Featured Projects

Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall) Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall)

On 03, Jan 2021 | In | By Admin

Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall)

Merge (Lynnmour Sound Wall – 2021), will feature twenty naturalistic colours which represent a selection of local flora, fauna and landmarks specific to the Lynnmour community and area.  Merge stands at 4m tall and spans 356m along the newly reconfigured section of the Trans-Canada Highway (Hwy 1) between Ironworkers Memorial Second Narrows Crossing and Lynn Creek.  The acoustic dampening sound wall sits between the highway and the residential neighbourhood along Keith Road and is clad in colourful powder-coated aluminum panels.  The panels have been carefully configured to produce a giant site-specific spectrum designed to be viewed by both passing traffic and residents in nearby communities.

Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic Maple Ridge Community Mosaic

On 26, Feb 2020 | In | By Admin

Maple Ridge Community Mosaic

The Maple Ridge Community Mosaic has been designed to fit in three different locations at the newly renovated Leisure Centre: reception, the gathering area, and beside the pool shower – covering 410 square feet total. The Maple Ridge Community Mosaic celebrates the Leisure Centre as an important social hub.  Following a consistent equilateral grid, the tiles are laid out into hundreds of unique geometric patterns which have been arranged by colour within a rhythm of diagonal bands.  Symbolically, triangles represent the strongest natural shape. Any added force is evenly spread through all three sides and then distributed outward to neighbouring triangles. Like cells and crystals, and individuals within a community, each triangle gains even greater strength when they are organized together with other individuals to form a greater whole.  

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Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation

On 31, Jan 2020 | In | By Admin

Wood Street Pump Station – Public Art Consultation

The City of New Westminster selected Rebecca as the public art consultant for the Wood Street Pump Station upgrade (2019).  The pump station helps manage water levels in the Queensborough neighbourhood and is located on the bank of the Fraser River’s north arm, directly beside the Queensborough bridge and at the end of the Wood Street canal.

The aim of this project is to improve vital urban infrastructure and integrate the infrastructure more closely with the local neighbourhood.  The public art components include various sculptural elements: water level markers on both the river side and the canal side, bird and bee habitat for local species, a vibrant colour scheme for the pump station facility, way-finding ‘caps’  for existing mooring piles, and the creative use of a metal screen that provides security and visual appeal by blending into the landscape.

In collaboration with architects, landscape architects, engineers, and City officials, the public art here responds to the local river, land masses, flora and fauna, urban infrastructure and recreational pathways, including the Experience The Fraser regional route.

TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts

On 12, Sep 2018 | In | By Admin

TTC Sherbourne – The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts

‘The Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of Its Parts’ is inspired by the vibrant communities that merge together every day at Sherbourne station. The design of each panel was created by blending together different patterns collected from local public workshops. The 39 mosaics located throughout the station welcome commuters in the universal languages of colour and geometry.  The twelve distinct colours of ceramic tiles reference the bold palette of Tom Thomson, the renowned Canadian landscape painter who once had a studio in the Rosedale Ravine nearby.

The Sherbourne Station Community Mosaic public artwork was commissioned by the Toronto Transit Commission as part of the Easier Access and Second Exit Program.

GIANT GIANT GIANT GIANT

On 13, Jun 2018 | No Comments | In | By Admin

GIANT

GIANT (2018)

The Pacific Northwest’s iconic Douglas Fir tree was chosen as an emblem for the face of the new Lightworks building because the original structure was built almost entirely out of this local natural resource.  Douglas Fir was harvested from the Vancouver area and milled locally on the shores of False Creek and Burrard Inlet.  Lumber from these trees was the primary construction material for many local buildings across the city and around the region.

At 71′ tall, ‘Giant’ represents a juvenile Douglas Fir tree, standing at the approximate height a real Douglas Fir might be in 2018, had it started from seed when the Lightworks building was first built in 1942.  The name ‘Giant’ plays with the notion of scale as this species of tree living on the BC coast can grow 4-5 times larger than this (up to 350′ tall), and can live for over 400 years.  ‘Giant’ is a reminder of our position in time and space amongst the environment that surrounds us.

Commission by PC Urban

Art Consultation by Ballard Fine Art

 

 

Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness Whereness

On 05, Aug 2016 | In | By Admin

Whereness

‘Whereness’ connects the past to the present, continually unfolding as we move through space and time. The sculpture acknowledges the practice of piling rocks at certain points along pathways to guide travelers crossing the landscape. This simple custom is still common across cultures around the world.

‘Whereness’ provides a tactile link between the area’s geological past and its current state. The bottom boulder of the sculpture is a granite glacial erratic, deposited at this address thousands of years ago as a huge ice sheet receded up the Fraser Valley. This very boulder was scanned and replicated six times, then stacked to form a visual puzzle. Read more…

Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic Calder Community Mosaic

On 24, Jul 2016 | In | By Admin

Calder Community Mosaic

The 4.8m x 2.4m mosaic mural is located in the Community Room of the new Calder Branch of the Edmonton Public Library. It is visible from the library’s forecourt.

The mosaic design is based on tessellating patterns within a grid of equilateral triangles, inspired by new and traditional patterns that were contributed by local residents at workshops held around the Calder neighbourhood in Spring 2016. The final blended pattern represents the interdependence of parts within a whole.  Triangles have been used in patterns across cultures for millennia and patterned tile layouts have been used in public spaces to indicate use, provide way-finding, add beauty, encourage social interaction and offer inspiration. Geometrically, equilateral triangles provide many shape and pattern possibilities; they can create both linear and radial patterns, and can be arranged into hexagons, stars, diamonds, zig-zags, curves, and other shapes.

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City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric City Fabric

On 01, Aug 2015 | In | By Admin

City Fabric

City Fabric is a project by Vancouver-based artist Rebecca Bayer and artist/architect Matthew Soules, commissioned with 221A Gallery and Burrard Arts Foundation in cooperation with the City of Vancouver. The installation is made up of construction safety netting, a material designed for temporary use that has become iconic in Vancouver—a city that since the 1980s has been under intensive real estate speculation and development. Typically used to protect passersby from construction hazards, ten sections of the netting (amounting to 800 lineal feet) have been stretched between the concrete piers of the Burrard Street Bridge. City Fabric cherishes the temporary permanence of construction debris netting; beautiful, impoverished for its utilitarian use, yet profoundly normal. (text: Brian McBay, curator 221A Gallery)

Motif of One and Many Motif of One and Many Motif of One and Many Motif of One and Many Motif of One and Many

On 08, Sep 2014 | In | By Admin

Motif of One and Many

Location: City of Richmond, BC

Completed: September 2015

Motif of One and Many explores the idea of a community as the creation of a whole that is greater than the simple sum of its parts. The colourful grid of tessellating triangles covers the floor in a new community centre and considers individuals and groups who have come together to form complex new relationships. Research conducted at the City of Richmond Archives inspired a layout that echoes ancient motifs and acknowledges the city’s cultural diversity. The word ‘motif’ commonly refers to ‘a repeated theme or pattern,’ a term used in visual arts, textile arts, and folklore. The origin of the word ‘motif’ also refers to ‘a motive,’ as in ‘that which inwardly moves a person’.

Stanley Park Dedications Stanley Park Dedications Stanley Park Dedications Stanley Park Dedications Stanley Park Dedications

By Admin

On 01, Aug 2013 | In | By Admin

Stanley Park Dedications

Location: Stanley Park. Vancouver, BC.

Artist: Rebecca Bayer (with Ten Fifteen Maple)

This project coincided with the 125th anniversary of Stanley Park.

As part of the group residency at Ten Fifteen Maple (Hadden Park Fieldhouse), Rebecca took part in installing a series of twenty-five engraved cedar plaques on the backrests of Stanley Park benches.

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Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take Kiosk / Give & Take

On 01, Aug 2013 | In | By Admin

Kiosk / Give & Take

Location: Burnaby Gallery Off-site at Metrotown, BC.

Designer: spacemakeplace

Photography: spacemakeplace

Presented as an offsite project for the Burnaby Art Gallery, KIOSK is a temporary installation at Civic Square, Bob Prittie Library, Metrotown, that played host to a series of unique public art projects in Summer 2013.
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Floor Project Floor Project Floor Project

On 01, Oct 2010 | No Comments | In | By Admin

Floor Project

Location: Burrard Bridge. Vancouver, BC.

Artist: spacemakeplace

Photography: spacemakeplace

Sheltered below Vancouver’s Burrard Street Bridge, this floor was made using a simple temporary surface treatment on concrete slab, creating a ‘floor’ for this existing ‘room’ in the city’s infrastructure.  The bold and colourful geometric pattern welcomes passers-by to step inside for a moment.